The financial benefits of higher education

Working adults who have a bachelor’s degree earn substantially more than someone with only a high school degree, according a College Board study.1 The study compares median incomes and show that, on average, it is:

  • $35,400 for a high school graduate. 
  • $56,500 for those with a bachelor’s degree

This does not mean you’ll have to save hundreds of thousands to get your child into Harvard or Yale. The Ivy League has no monopoly on excellence in education – and there are many opportunities to apply for aid and scholarships. In the 2012-2013 school year, undergraduate students received an average of $13,730 in aid.2 What’s more, average tuition at a four-year public college for in-state students was $8,893; for a community college it was $3,264.3

In the 2012-2013 school year, undergraduate students received an average of $13,730 in aid.2 What’s more, average tuition at a community college for in-state students was $3,264, and the average at a four-year public college for in-state students was $8,893.3

1Source: The College Board, Education Pays 2013: The Benefits of Higher Education for Individuals, October 2013.
2Source: The College Board, Trends in Student Aid 2013, October 2013.
3Source: The College Board, Trends in College Pricing 2013, October 2013.

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